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Keeping on track with Whitianga Town Centre upgrade

Press Release – Thames Coromandel District Council

We’re literally keeping on track with Stage Two of the Whitianga Town upgrade, with the path being built between Taylors Mistake and The Esplanade getting closer to completion.Keeping on track with Whitianga Town Centre upgrade

We’re literally keeping on track with Stage Two of the Whitianga Town upgrade, with the path being built between Taylors Mistake and The Esplanade getting closer to completion.

The topsoil stripping at Taylors Mistake, to create the new path alignment, has been finished and power conduits laid for the streetlights to go in.

Bidim cloth and a subbase has also been laid along the path, with timber box edging underway.

A 1.8 meter-high fence has been erected around the construction site, both at the site compound at Taylors Mistake and the new water-playground area, for health and safety purposes.

“Overall, we’ve had extremely positive feedback from the public,” says says Andrew Boden, our Council’s project manager.

“We’re holding fortnightly construction impact meetings, with the next one planned for 29 April at 2pm,” says Mr Boden.

Meanwhile, two existing Maori Princess trees have been relocated to new locations along the hoggin path at Taylors Mistake.

The timber decking construction at the plaza has been completed including the balustrade fencing.

The water-playground area at the Esplanade will be completed with one more concrete pour to be done this week.

For more information visit our project page.

Get your history fix at the Mercury Bay Museum
Every week we continue promoting businesses affected by the upgrade. This week we spoke to the manager of the Mercury Bay Museum, at 11 The Esplanade, opposite the wharf.

The Mercury Bay Museum opened in 1979 and has a wonderful array of exhibits and artefacts relating to the Polynesian navigator Kupe, Captain James Cook and his ship The Endeavour, the HMS Buffalo (which sunk off Mercury Bay in 1840), kauri timber and gum. The old dairy factory in which the museum is housed, also has early settlers’ records, fishing displays and a wonderful photographic collection.

Rebecca Cox has been the manager for three years. Previous to this she was a kindergarten teacher in Auckland, but moved to Whitianga with her partner and three children for a change of lifestyle.

“We run a local promotion so anyone local who pays rates within the district will only be charged a $6 entry fee, compared to the usual rate of $7.50” says Rebecca.

“Children under 13 are free and we also do a family pass for $15,” she says.

Rebecca and the team encourage you to go and check out the exhibits.

For more information visit their website or their Facebook page.

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