David Parker heads to London and Davos World Economic Forum

Press Release – New Zealand Government

Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker leaves for London and Switzerland on Tuesday for a series of meetings on trade and economic issues.
Hon David Parker

Minister for Trade and Export Growth

21 January 2018

MEDIA STATEMENT

Minister for Trade and Export Growth heads to London and Davos World Economic Forum

Minister for Trade and Export Growth David Parker leaves for London and Switzerland on Tuesday for a series of meetings on trade and economic issues.

In London Mr Parker will hold talks with the Rt Hon David Davis, Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, and the Rt Hon Michael Gove, Secretary of State for Agriculture.

Mr Parker says New Zealand is a natural partner for the UK.

“We enjoy a close friendship based on deep cultural and historical links, shared values and our long history of working together internationally. We also share a commitment to open markets and progressive and inclusive trading arrangements.”

During the recent visit to New Zealand by UK Secretary of State for International Trade, the Rt Hon Liam Fox, the two discussed ways to strengthen bilateral trade and economic ties.

“This means ensuring we will not be disadvantaged as a result of Brexit, as well as moving quickly to seize new opportunities,” Mr Parker says.

They would include a comprehensive, modern, and high quality free trade agreement with the UK once it leaves the EU.

At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Mr Parker will take part in a session examining challenges facing global trade and investment. He said the New Zealand Government is concerned about inequality and is taking steps to address it.

At the meeting, he will raise issues of how much wealth is being accumulated by those with capital compared to wage earners.

He will also join other WTO Trade Ministers to discuss the implications for world trade of last month’s WTO Ministerial meeting in Buenos Aires.

“It was not possible to reach agreement last month to cap the subsidies major countries give their agriculture sectors, nor to implement rules to make the regulation of services more transparent, predictable and accessible. We need to keep working on those issues,” Mr Parker says.

There was, though, some progress on two environmental issues – addressing the global harm being caused by fossil fuel subsidies and the harm caused by fisheries subsidies.

“I want to work with other WTO members to ensure that we can conclude negotiations to prohibit harmful fisheries subsidies before 2020.”

Content Sourced from scoop.co.nz
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