Safely Performing Thyroid Procedures As Day Surgery

Press Release – Royal Australasian College of Surgeons

Well selected patients can safely undergo hemi-thyroid surgery as day patients, delegates to the 82nd Annual Scientific Congress (ASC) of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons have been told.ROYAL AUSTRALASIAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS

MEDIA RELEASE

Safely Performing Thyroid Procedures As Day Surgery

Thursday 9 May, 2013

Well selected patients can safely undergo hemi-thyroid surgery as day patients, delegates to the 82nd Annual Scientific Congress (ASC) of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons have been told.

Dr Jacques Marnewick, who was a trainee endocrine surgeon at Waikato Hospital in Hamilton, said ambulatory thyroid surgery, in which the patient is discharged on the day of surgery without overnight stay, is not widely practised in Australasia but is practised in many large international institutions, particularly in Europe and America.

“We decided therefore to report on our early experience with ambulatory hemi-thyroid procedures at a New Zealand tertiary hospital,” he said. “This involved a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on all partial and hemi-thyroidectomy patients between 1 November 2009 and 31 December 2012, who were operated on by a single, high volume endocrine surgeon.” Strict inclusion and discharge criteria were required to ensure appropriate patient selection and safe discharge after surgery.

“Of 82 partial/hemi-thyroidectomy patients over this time period, 58 were considered suitable for discharge as ambulatory surgical patients. Thirty-five of these were discharged as same day procedures. A further 23 patients remained overnight due only to the distance of their residence from a 24 hour medical facility but otherwise met criteria for same day discharge. The remaining 24 were considered unsuitable for ambulatory surgery, however 22 were discharged from hospital within 24 hours from the time of admission. Two patients required a hospital stay longer than one night, which was expected in both cases.

“Of all these patients, there was only one re-presentation of surgical complication, with an infected seroma,” Dr Marnewick said.

“Our early experience suggests that in carefully selected patients, ambulatory partial and hemi-thyroid surgery can be safely achieved and is feasible within an Australasian tertiary hospital setting.”

Approximately 1200 surgeons from New Zealand, Australia and around the world are attending the ASC, which runs from 6 to 10 May and is being held at Auckland’s Skycity/Crowne Plaza Convention Centre.

ENDS

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