Mountain Safety Council Reminds Trampers to Follow Code

Press Release – NZ Mountain Safety Council

Following four separate incidents in Tongariro National Park, the Mountain Safety Council is urging all visitors to the area to plan and prepare for a safe adventure and carry a form of emergency communication.Mountain Safety Council Reminds Tongariro Trampers to Follow Outdoor Safety Code

Following four separate incidents in Tongariro National Park, the Mountain Safety Council is urging all visitors to the area to plan and prepare for a safe adventure and carry a form of emergency communication.

Mountain Safety Council spokesperson, Andrea Corrigan said the Tongariro Crossing is commonly regarded as one of the best day tramps in the world, but with some parts of the track still closed since last year’s volcanic eruptions, more people have been using the alternative route of Mt Ngauruhoe.

Extra care should be taken if choosing this route to the summit as it’s easy to dislodge loose rocks and debris, which could fall on people below.

‘We are encouraging people to get out there and enjoy all that the park has to offer, but taking a few simple precautions and knowing your limits, especially when traversing steep and tricky terrain, is essential to enjoying it safely,’ said Ms Corrigan.

‘New Zealand’s Outdoor Safety Code should be the starting point for any trip into the outdoors.’

‘The five simple rules provide guidance on how to plan, prepare and act in the outdoors and are applicable to all land-based activities whether it’s a short walk in the bush, a day adventure mountain biking or hunting or a longer multi-day mountain adventure.’

‘If the worst does happen, and a serious incident occurs, then having the means to raise the alert and summon emergency assistance can be crucial.’

The Mountain Safety Council recommends carrying a form of emergency communication such as a personal locator beacon (PLB) because cell phone coverage is not guaranteed, and cannot be relied upon in remote areas.

The Mountain Safety Council provides free outdoor safety information and resources via their website and also run outdoor courses covering topics such as bushcraft, survival, risk management, river safety and outdoor first aid to help people get the most out of their outdoors activities.

The New Zealand Outdoor Safety Code:

1. Plan your trip
Seek local knowledge and plan the route you will take and the amount of time you can reasonably expect it to take. Department of Conservation (DOC) Visitor Centres, i-SITEs and local operators are a good source of local information.

2. Tell someone
Tell someone your plans and complete written Outdoors Intentions BEFORE leaving on your trip. There are tools that make it easy on the www.adventuresmart.org.nz website. At the very least, tell a friend or family member where you are going and date and time to raise the alarm if you haven’t returned.

3. Be aware of the weather
New Zealand’s weather can be highly unpredictable. Check the forecast and expect weather changes. Check track and hut conditions. Beware of rivers – if in doubt STAY OUT.

4. Know your limits
Challenge yourself within your physical limits and experience. Take a Mountain Safety Council course.

5. Take sufficient supplies
Make sure you have enough food, clothing, equipment and emergency rations for the worst-case scenario. Take an appropriate means of communication such as a Mountain Radio or Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) and know how to use them.

More information on how to enjoy New Zealand’s great outdoors safely can be found on the Mountain Safety Council’s website www.mountainsafety.org.nz

ENDS

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