2010 Waikato BOP Architecture Awards

Press Release – Waikato Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards

A “one of a kind house”, a groundbreaking eco classroom and the Waitomo Glowworm Cave Visitor Centre are among designs celebrated in the 2010 Waikato Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards. New Zealand Architecture
Awards 2010/11

MEDIA RELEASE

30 October 2010


2010 Waikato Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards announced
A “one of a kind house”, a groundbreaking eco classroom and the Waitomo Glowworm Cave Visitor Centre are among designs celebrated in the 2010 Waikato Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards.

The Waikato Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards programme, organised and run by the New Zealand Institute of Architects and supported by Resene, attracted a significant number of entries, with 42 submissions.

Taupo-based architect Sean Harris, a member of the jury panel, said the standard had been very good, with a range of different projects spread widely throughout the region.

“There was a broad spectrum in the residential categories from those built on very modest budgets to the top end of the market,” he said.

“We visited all entries and enjoyed meeting the owners and seeing how enthusiastic they were about their architects’ work and the way they had interpreted the brief.”

Fascinating house with bow tie shaped floor

The Fussell House, by Richard Priest Architecture, on the edge of the Purangi River estuary at Whitianga, was a winner in Residential Architecture – Houses, praised as a “fascinating house” which is “impressive in concept and form”.

Jurors admired the “bow-tie shaped” floor plan, with living areas overlooking Mercury Bay and agreed that “the client’s request for a signature styled, one-of-a-kind home has been delivered with interest”.
Groundbreaking EnviroClassroom

The Hukanui EnviroClassroom “The Living Room” at Hukanui School in Hamilton, by Antanas Procuta Architects, was the only winner in the Sustainable Architecture Category.

The classroom, hailed by jurors as “groundbreaking” was designed and built with input from students at every stage and includes unique sustainable features.

Jurors described it as a “living laboratory that enables students to understand building environments, passive systems and how these systems can be modified to achieve a healthy and comfortable space”.

Glowing citation for Glowworm cave

The extensive Waitomo Glowworm Cave Visitor Centre, which includes an innovative woven canopy, charmed jurors with its organic form and the way it flows beneath the road.

Jurors said the project, by Architecture Workshop, a winner in the Commercial Architecture category, reinforced the idea of “a simple lightweight sky shell to act as a counterpoint to the main subterranean attraction”.

Mr Harris said: “The experience starts as soon as you arrive. The visitor centre is part of the whole journey into the caves.”

Commercial Architecture winners

Commercial Architecture winners also included The Fraser Papamoa project, by Ambienti Architects, a “flexible” sales office for the Coast Papamoa Beach residential development at Mount Maunganui which was seen as an innovative approach to marketing offices and showroom.

The twin level pavilion, admired by jurors for its “crisp clean lines” has been designed so that it can be transformed, when required, into a community facility – potentially with café, shops and offices.

The APL Training Facility in Hamilton, by Edwards White Architects, is an extensive renovation of an existing building to provide a training centre for a national business.

Jurors said that the sustainable approach taken to the design had given the previously run down building a new lease of life, making it “a significant visual presence in an otherwise haphazard streetscape”.

The Village Centre, Lauriston Park, by BSW Architects, was admired as “an instantly recognisable entry point” to the Cambridge retirement village providing a “dramatic counterpoint within the peaceful and restful environment”.

Public Architecture

Public Architecture winners also included Mount Maunganui College Resource and Research Centre Redevelopment by Dimensions Ltd.

Jurors said that creative planning, major renovation and extensive refurbishment had transformed the original outmoded library to provide a flexible facility that had assumed a new identity and prime position on the college campus.

Mr Harris said jurors were impressed by features such as flexible “study pods” within the building, its multiple uses, including as a Year 13 common room and the clear enjoyment of students using the facility.

The Glenview Primary School – New Library by Peddle Thorp Architects (Hamilton) was also a winner in the category. Jurors described it as attractive and welcoming, answering its design brief for “something unique” and enjoying “an invigorating and engaging ambience”.

Residential Architecture – Houses

A contemporary Country House, North Waikato, at Tuakau, by Kamermans & Co Architects was seen as a “reinterpretation of the ‘New Zealand farm shed’ vernacular,” capturing the sun and majestic views of the Waikato River valley.

Orkney, a distinctive multi-level home at Mount Maunganui by Daniel Marshall Architect, captured jurors’ attention for its flair and imagination and “sharply raking walls that mimic the prows of ships on the nearby harbour”.

A Coromandel Beach House, by Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects (Auckland) has been likened to a “jewellery box”.

Jurors noted the way “projections and cut outs punctuate the envelope, variously admitting light and capturing specific views.”

The Meldrum House in Tauranga by DHT Architects takes full advantage of a narrow sloping site, providing sweeping views to the inner harbour and Mount Maunganui and beyond.

The Motuoapa House at Turangi, Taupo, by Mark Frazerhurst Architect, was built on a modest budget and is “suitably rugged” for holiday living with planes of tactile materials that filter sunlight through slatted timber screens that blend with the cladding of the exterior.

A modern holiday home, in Nininihi Avenue, Raglan, by Tim Dorrington Architects, was “full of surprises” transforming effortlessly from cosy individual spaces to open plan when required.

The “re-use and transformation of a home in the Hamilton Lake Alterations project by Edwards White Architects, was seen to achieve a “coherent and striking structure that sits comfortably in its surroundings”.

The redevelopment of a lakeside holiday home, Lake Tarawera Bach Alterations, also by Edwards White Architects, was admired as having “resulted in a new home that is sympathetic to its surroundings and offers a higher level of amenity to its owners.”

Additions to the McDonald House at Ohope, by Architecture Page Henderson, are separated from the original house by a new common entrance, providing independent and/or extended family living with small private spaces and a large communal area that opens over outdoor decks to the beach.

Small Project Architecture
Hamilton’s Woodstock Primary School – New Entry & Library Computing Additions by Peddle Thorp Architects (Hamilton) was a winner in the Small Project Architecture category, described by jurors as a bold and welcoming new design which had brought the formerly obscure public entrance to the school to life.
Interior Architecture
The NZI on Collingwood project by Pelorus Architecture was the only winner in the Interior Architecture category.
Jurors praised the sustainable and energy-efficient principles, well managed, open design and clever use of sculptural forms and of colour resulting in “a pleasant working and client environment”.
Jurors
Convenor was Hamilton Architect John Sexton. He was joined on the jury by Architect Mark Wassung, also of Hamilton and Taupo Architect Sean Harris. The lay juror was Monica Holt, communications manager at Hamilton City Council.
As well as visiting all properties, the judges met with the architects and clients. The buildings were judged against a series of key criteria including their contribution to the advancement of architecture as a discipline and enhancement of the human spirit.
For more award winning New Zealand architecture visit www.nzia.co.nz


About the New Zealand Architecture Awards
The New Zealand Architecture Awards programme was established by the New Zealand Institute of Architects to celebrate the innovation, creativity and excellence of architectural projects nationwide.
The awards are open to all NZIA Practices, and projects can be entered into one or more of 10 categories – Public Architecture, Residential Architecture – Housing, Residential Architecture – Multiple Housing, Commercial Architecture, Urban Design, Interior Architecture, Heritage, Small Project Architecture, Sustainability, and Enduring Architecture.

There is no limit to the number of awards the local jury can make in any category.

The programme has three tiers, progressing from the eight regional awards to national recognition – the New Zealand Architecture Awards – and through to the ultimate accolade, the New Zealand Architecture Medal.

All local winners become eligible for consideration for a New Zealand Architecture Award, decided by a national jury, which includes an overseas judge, in early 2011.

In May at the NZIA’s annual Gala Dinner, the finalists for the New Zealand Architecture Medal will be announced, and the winner named later in the evening. Only one New Zealand Architecture Medal is bestowed each year, in recognition of a single built work.

2010 Waikato Bay of Plenty Architecture Awards
Judges Citations
An extensive renovation, which meets the company’s needs by taking a sustainable approach to the design, has given this previously run-down building a new lease of life as a contemporary training facility. The bold, clean and simple lines of the front façade showcase the APL brand, and give the building a significant visual presence in an otherwise haphazard streetscape with busy signage. The interior fit-out, which includes the strategic selection of colours, materials, finishing and lighting, is enhanced by careful detailing and offers a stylish, functional multi-use space.

Ambienti Architects Ltd
Commercial Architecture
Fraser Papamoa

Part of a coastal residential development, this twin level Pavilion provides marketing offices and a showroom and can be transformed, when required, into a community centre. Strategic space planning and the careful placement of permanent accommodation and services ensure functional flexibility. Externally, the choice of cedar rain screens and glass, combined with vertical cedar wings and moveable louvres, create an ever-changing play of light and shade over the façades. Crisp, clean lines and well-balanced volumes complement the simplicity of the structure.

BSW Architects Limited
Commercial Architecture
Village Centre, Lauriston Park

This building’s central position helps create an instantly recognizable entry point to the village, enabling easy access for all residents. All amenities are linked through a central atrium space and planned with views of the site’s notable features: an historic homestead, a mature grove of trees and the open vista to the North. The architectural language is deliberately contemporary, dynamic and dissimilar to the existing homestead and residential components of the village. This produces a dramatic counterpoint within the peaceful and restful environment. Sustainable and energy-efficient design has been a priority in the building’s development.

Architecture Workshop Ltd
Commercial Architecture
Waitomo Glowworm Cave Visitor Centre

Sheltered below an innovative woven timber canopy, the new amenities for visitors to the Waitomo Caves include tourist gathering areas, a 250-seat dining space, retail, seminar and exhibition areas, as well as a café and theatre. Pedestrian flows are carefully managed for both convenience and experience, with the cave entrance accessed from the upper path while a lower path returns visitors back alongside the stream exit. The simple base structure extends from the contours of the land and is visually independent of the curved geometry of the canopy overhead. This reinforces the central idea of a simple lightweight ‘sky shell’ to act as a counterpoint to the main subterranean attraction.

Angus, Flood & Griffiths
Enduring Architecture
Former Angus, Flood and Griffiths Architectural Offices

Designed by Doug Angus in 1954, the former Angus Flood and Griffiths Office [No 1] in Hamilton is regionally significant, being the Waikato’s only purpose-built, leading edge modern architectural office of that era. Sadly, the original roofs and upper walls were lost to view when the site was redeveloped in the 1980s. However, internally the building is remarkably intact and the open plan workplace still works today over fifty years on. The building is considered to be one of the best examples of Doug Angus’ early works, and remains a fitting symbol of the historic significance of the practice of Angus, Flood and Griffith.

Pelorus Architecture Limited
Interior Architecture
NZI on Collingwood

This interior fit-out incorporates the principles of sustainability and energy-efficiency that formed part of the brief for the design of the building. Well managed, open plan interior design provides for individual and group activity, and shared meeting spaces cater for in-house and visitor groups. Clever use of sculptural forms break up the visual lines of the glass walls, and the use of primary colours is restrained. The result is a pleasant working and client environment.

Peddle Thorp Architects (Hamilton) Ltd
Public Architecture
Glenview Primary School – New Library

Strong lines and bold colours present an attractive frontage to this new primary school library and lead into a welcoming reception area. The double height volume chosen for the main library space with its slanted glass wall is cleverly separated from the adjoining single storey spaces by a curved dividing wall. Externally, this height gives the building a striking profile. Form and colour set it apart from the surrounding older weatherboard buildings and answer the design brief requirement for something unique. Careful attention to material selection for noise attenuation makes for an invigorating and engaging ambience.

Dimensions Limited
Public Architecture
Mount Maunganui College Resource and Research Centre Re-development

Creative planning, major renovation and extensive refurbishment have transformed the original, outmoded Library into a modern ‘Resource and Research Centre’. Its facilities now satisfy current learning patterns and provide flexibility for future development. Carefully crafted over the bones of the original structure, the completed building complements the sharp roof forms of the adjacent administration and music buildings. It assumes a new identity and prime position on the College Campus.

Kamermans & Co Architects Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Country House, North Waikato

This contemporary single storey farm-house – a re-interpretation of the ‘NZ farm shed’ vernacular – is designed as a series of pavilions linked by a circulation spine with small courtyards between. Rustic cladding and simple mono-pitched roof lines combine to preserve the rural feel. Sited with the main glazing to the north, it captures the sun and majestic views of the Waikato River valley. Its many sustainable features reinforce the impression of a building designed to be at one with its environment.

Richard Priest Architecture
Residential Architecture – Houses
Fussell House

Located on the edge of the Purangi River estuary, this fascinating house is impressive in concept and form. Built around a double storey curved concrete spine wall, its expansive cantilevered floors stretch dramatically towards the water below. The modest entrance on the upper floor opens up to reveal a ‘bow-tie’ shaped floor plan with living areas that overlook Mercury Bay. The curved interior plan produces a rich variety of angles and views ensuring a constant sense of discovery as one moves through the house. The material palette is deliberately understated so as to accentuate the inherent strength of the concrete wall; this contrasts with native timbers that are used for floor and ceiling linings. Best appreciated from the water, the house harmonises with its surroundings. The client’s request for a signature styled, one-of-a-kind home has been delivered with interest.

Edwards White Architects Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Hamilton Lake Alterations

The re-use and transformation of this house has been skilfully managed to achieve a coherent and striking structure that sits comfortably in its surroundings. Clean contemporary forms resting on a plinth of dark stained cedar extend from the original gable roof structure behind. New living space upstairs takes full advantage of expansive lake views and opens onto a covered north-facing deck. It draws away from the street front, gaining privacy and protection from prevailing winds.

Edwards White Architects Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Lake Tarawera Bach Alterations

The redevelopment of this lakeside bach on a site with sublime views has resulted in a new home that is sympathetic to its surroundings and offers a higher level of amenity to the owners. Living spaces on the upper floor extend outdoor onto covered decks that provide solar control and shelter from cold winds. The extensively remodelled interiors with dark stained custom-designed joinery units offer a contrast to the clean white walls. The apparent simplicity of the remodelling hides highly sophisticated detailing and complements sculptural elements in the walls and stairs.

Architecture Page Henderson Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
McDonald House

The additions are separated from the original house by a new, common entrance. This provides independent and/or extended family living with small private spaces and a large communal area that opens over outdoor decks to the beach beyond. Planned around an open internal courtyard with panoramic views, the design meets the dual challenge of providing shelter from onshore winds and privacy from other beach users. The house combines a sure design touch and flair with careful material selection and detailing.

DHT Architects Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Meldrum House

A narrow sloping site has been fully exploited by this house to take advantage of sweeping views to the inner harbour and Mt Maunganui beyond. Draped across the site’s rising contours, it blends into its surroundings. With interior layouts and details that reduce visual block to a minimum, the house offers a cheerful blend of intimacy and transparency. Mature pohutakawa trees on the front boundary frame out the approach from the street and soften the building form.

Mark Frazerhurst Architect Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Motuoapa House

This family holiday house turns its back on the neighbours and orients its spaces towards Lake Taupo. Overlapping planes of various tactile materials filter sunlight though slatted timber screens that blend with the cladding of the exterior. It has been built to a modest budget for casual holiday living and is suitably rugged for the purpose. External materials are repeated internally in different ways and large areas of glazing reinforce specific connections to the site.

Tim Dorrington Architects Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Nihinihi Avenue

Located to capture views over the river estuary and distant harbour entrance, this modern holiday home is a composition of separate forms – two black-stained timber boxes that overhang a concrete plinth. Full of surprises, the house transforms effortlessly from cosy individual spaces to open plan when required. A covered deck opening from the living space provides another intimate space within the whole. The house is a predominantly white-painted space with a deliberately reduced colour palette. Accent colours from the natural materials and furnishings complement the aesthetic.

Daniel Marshall Architect Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Orkney

This distinctive multi-level home sits apart from its suburban neighbours with its sharply raking walls that mimic the prows of ships on the nearby harbour. It has been designed with flair and imagination on an angular footprint that follows the shape of the site. Set around a generous stairway that meanders through the house linking the various parts together, the building is impressive on every level. Planes, volumes, materials and transitions all work together seamlessly to provide a functional and spacious family living environment.

Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects (Auckland) Ltd
Residential Architecture – Houses
Coromandel Beach House

This small holiday home oriented towards sun and ocean sits across the end of a long, narrow site. Relatively compact, it has been likened to a jewellery box, with a highly efficient use of available space that flows casually onto the sand and down to the water’s edge. Projections and cut outs punctuate the envelope, variously admitting light and capturing specific views, while slatted folding shutters across the living areas provide shelter from stormy weather. Careful attention to detailing and material selection complete the design with a seemingly effortless quality.

Peddle Thorp Architects (Hamilton) Ltd
Small Project Architecture
Woodstock Primary School – New Entry & Library Computing Additions

The formerly obscure, difficult-to-find public entrance to Woodstock School has been brought to life by this bold new design. The entrance now provides a sheltered assembly or drop-off point for students, and covered access for visitors. The bold colours, impressive scale and strong horizontal lines both welcome and lead visitors to the new school entrance and foyer. New paved areas complete the work and provide links to the adjacent buildings. These include the adjacent computer suite and library, which have been extended and refurbished as part of the project.

Antanas Procuta Architects Ltd
Sustainable Architecture
Hukanui EnviroClassroom “The Living Room”

This groundbreaking project, appropriately named The Living Room, is firmly focused on sustainability. Designed by the students, with guidance from experts engaged to help them, the project embraces a variety of environmental strategies and construction methodologies. The building was opened in 2009 and is a living laboratory that enables students to understand building environments, passive systems and how these systems can be modified to achieve a healthy and comfortable space.
ENDS

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