NZ Has The Power To Reduce Energy Bills

Press Release – Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority

New Zealand households and businesses will find that taking easy energy saving actions can far outweigh any increased energy and transport fuel costs as a result of the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), says Mike Underhill, Chief Executive of the Energy …
New Zealand Has The Power To Significantly Reduce Energy Bills

New Zealand households and businesses will find that taking easy energy saving actions can far outweigh any increased energy and transport fuel costs as a result of the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), says Mike Underhill, Chief Executive of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA.

“Not only can businesses and households offset any prices increases, they have the opportunity to go further and significantly reduce their energy bills,” Mr Underhill said. From tomorrow, the energy sector enters the ETS, meaning transport fuel prices are likely to rise by about 3.5 cents per litre, and electricity costs by about 1.5 cents per kilowatt hour. For the average household, that’s about $3 a week in increased costs, or $165 a year.

“Simply by adopting efficient driving techniques such as keeping your car tyres pumped up and accelerating smoothly can save as much as 20% on your fuel bill. Using timers and thermostats for appliances such as heat pumps and heated towel rails can save several hundred dollars a year,” Mr Underhill said.

“It is the same for businesses. Obviously the actions are different depending on the size and the sector, but in our experience many businesses can save 20% – often more – off their annual energy bill through energy efficiency and renewable energy initiatives.”

EECA’s business website features a new interactive tool called Energy Leader that helps businesses find out what they can do to reduce their energy bill. After answering a few simple questions, businesses will receive a tailored action plan that will help focus energy saving efforts, measure progress and motivate staff to get on board.

“We have found that one of the biggest barriers to businesses reducing their energy bills is they just don’t know where to start. This new web-based tool will help point people in the right direction, and make it easier to start to take action,” Mr Underhill said.

In some cases, government funding is available to help consumers and businesses invest in ways to be more energy efficient, including grants for insulation, heating, solar water heating and business energy audits.

How households can offset the ETS price rises: Here are easy things households can do to reduce energy bills – most are cheap and some are free.

Action: Switch off your second or beer fridge
Cost to do: Free
Savings: $100 to $300

Action: Dry your clothes outside rather than using a dryer
Cost to do: Free
Savings: Around $200

Action: Only use your heated towel rails when needed
Cost to do: Free
Savings: $100

Action: Switch your appliances off at the wall when not in use
Cost to do: Free
Savings: Varies

Action: Shut your curtains at dusk to keep the heat in
Cost to do: Free
Savings: Varies

Action: Wash your clothes in cold rather than warm water
Cost to do: Free
Savings: $50 – $75

Action: Set your computer’s power-saving options
Cost to do: Free
Savings: Varies

Action: Replace a 100W bulb with an energy saving bulb
Cost to do: $5
Savings: $110 over life of the bulb

Action: If your shower fills up a 10 litre bucket in less than a minute, install an efficient shower head
Cost to do: Varies
Savings: $150 or more a year

Action: Wrap your electric hot water tank and the first few metres of hot water pipe
Cost to do: $70
Savings: $80 for an older cylinder

Action: Efficient driving techniques such as accelerating smoothly, changing to a higher gear earlier, and keeping car tyres pumped
Cost to do: Free
Savings: $400

More information for households can be found at

www.energywise.govt.nz

More information for businesses can be found at
www.eecabusiness.govt.nz

www.eecabusiness.govt.nz/energy-leader .

ENDS

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