Home insulation should be a woolly idea

Press Release – Federated Farmers

Federated Farmers is embracing the $323 million home insulation package announced in Budget 2009.  It is not only good for New Zealanders but by using poorer quality coarse wools, could also be good for the ailing wool industry. 

29 May 2009

Home insulation should be a woolly idea

Federated Farmers is embracing the $323 million home insulation package announced in Budget 2009.  It is not only good for New Zealanders but by using poorer quality coarse wools, could also be good for the ailing wool industry. 

“I’m walking the talk having installed wool insulation in my house last year and it’s a fantastic solution,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairman, an environmental award winning Hawke’s Bay farmer.

“We need to get wool into the insulation mix, having heard reports that Fletcher Building is increasing production of its glass fibre insulation.  Federated Farmers is currently checking with the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority to ensure wool insulation is on the list of approved products.

“Wool insulation meets the New Zealand Building Code and offers outstanding insulation properties proven in laboratory testing.  It easily matches the thermal efficiency of man-made products with a similar life expectancy too.

“Unlike glass fibres however, wool doesn’t represent a health hazard during installation so you don’t need masks or gloves. That’ll make DIYers and professional installers happy as well.  But being a natural product, wool insulation comes with the added bonus of having great sound insulation properties.

“Wool insulation cannot burn and is treated to make it vermin proof.  It’s an impressive product.

“Federated Farmers believes there is much to recommend wool insulation, especially if people care about the environment.  It demands less energy during the manufacturing process and is largely sourced from a natural and renewable resource, sheep.

“New Zealand’s wool industry has been suffering of late but potentially, this insulation package could give it a shot in the arm by using poorer quality coarse wools.  Trading off our ‘clean green’ image, it could offer new export potential too.

“We believe insulation is a positive Green policy backed by the Government.  It makes homes dryer, warmer and healthier and that makes sound economic sense.

“If we are making a long-term investment in healthier homes, it could make for a healthier wool industry too,” Mr Wills concluded.

ends

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1 comment:

  1. Chris Brownie Insulation, 12. June 2009, 14:20

    Hi There Mr Wills, I wish you all the best with EECA. I suspect they not be as helpful with your requests as you would wish. I have been processing stronger wools for insulation and installing it for many years.(It took a while for the Rural Community to come on board and use it….)Some three to four thousand homes in the South Island done properly 300mm from eave to eave and happy farmers too backing of the Coal Ranges when we are just halfway through the homestead and leaving the chainsaw spending more tome in the shed as a result. I am former and founding CHairman of the Wool Insulation Mnfrs,Assn. THere is plenty of shoddy work being done out there in fibreglass and macerated newspaper that does not have an ability to absorband discharge moisture like wool. I would not be beyond having a scrap with the authorities this time round as they are all mostly talking just plain horseshit. Vested interests I have alway suspected and too tired to get up in a ceiling space where the truth is. Look forward to having a chat on the phone sometime